“Parents Matter” with Sally Daniels of Augsburg College

Q: Why is parent/family relations important? A: It benefits the institution and it benefits the parents. Working with parents to answer their questions or connect them with the appropriate resource on campus definitely helps with enrollment. During the decision-making process, the program helps by providing useful information and building a relationship. And, being available to answer parent questions on an ongoing basis on myriad topics, such as financial aid and majors, is a retention … [Read more...]

“Access Success” with David McDonald of Western Oregon University

Student Paths Q & A for Enrollment Professionals by Western Oregon University's David McDonald Q: What’s the key to increasing freshmen student retention? A: Student retention (success) is the result of equal levels of effort and commitment by the student and the university. College graduation must be the students’ goal from the first day. Students must be open to changing work and study habits to meet the increased expectations and independence of college. Students must be willing … [Read more...]

“Reaching Retention Goals Through Collaboration with Academic Affairs” with Paige Illum, Ph.D. of Avila University

By: Paige Illum, Ph.D. Coordinator of Retention and the First Year Experience Avila University Kansas City, MO Departmental collaboration is a must in this era of limited time, money and personnel resources.  Not only is it smart in regard to resources but working interdepartmentally makes campus relationships stronger.  Additionally, student success and attainment of enrollment goals are more likely. Specifically, here are three ways to increase the connectivity between retention and … [Read more...]

“Student Retention Quiz” with Teresa Farnum of Farnum & Associates

Question 1:  What % of students drop out because they flunk out? The reality is that the vast majority of students who withdraw from college are in good academic standing at the time of withdrawal (estimates range between 75-85%). Thus, most students who leave college do so voluntarily—i.e., they do not “flunk out,” nor are they “forced out” by academic dismissal (Gardiner, 1994; Noel, 1985; Tinto, 1988, 1993; Willingham, 1985). Moreover, among the minority of students who are forced to … [Read more...]